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RELOCATION OF HAZARIBAGH TANNERY: MYTH OR REALITY?
48,99 € *
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RELOCATION OF HAZARIBAGH TANNERY: MYTH OR REALITY? ab 48.99 € als Taschenbuch: An Analysis from Environmental-Economics Aspect in the context of Bangladesh. Aus dem Bereich: Bücher, Kunst & Musik,

Anbieter: hugendubel
Stand: 22.09.2020
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In Defense of Internment: The Case for Racial P...
9,95 € *
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Everything you've been taught about the World War II "internment camps" in America is wrong: They were not created primarily because of racism or wartime hysteria They did not target only those of Japanese descent They were not Nazi-style death camps In her latest investigative tour-de-force, New York Times best-selling author Michelle Malkin sets the historical record straight - and debunks radical ethnic alarmists who distort history to undermine common-sense, national security profiling. The need for this myth-shattering book is vital. President Bush's opponents have attacked every homeland defense policy as tantamount to the "racist" and "unjustified" World War II internment. Bush's own transportation secretary, Norm Mineta, continues to milk his childhood experience at a relocation camp as an excuse to ban profiling at airports. 1. Language: English. Narrator: Craig Allen. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/acx0/001682/bk_acx0_001682_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 22.09.2020
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RELOCATION OF HAZARIBAGH TANNERY: MYTH OR REALITY?
49,00 € *
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Leather industry is one of the export oriented industries of Bangladesh which is gaining both economic and industrial importance now a day. The migration of leather tanning activity from developed to developing countries over the past four decades has also helped this manufacturing activity to increase. The main tannery area is at Hazaribagh in Dhaka. Since precautionary and protective measures have not been taken from the beginning, the environmental condition of Hazaribagh area has been deteriorating for many years. Eventually, it fosters the need of securing this development and growth of tanneries by ensuring the environmental security of the tanning sector and government has launched a relocation project of tannery industries from Hazaribagh to a new area located at Savar. But this relocation project proves to go in vain because of unwillingness to move of the tannery owners and in terms of the cost effectiveness and potential environmental threat of the new area. The redevelopment of the Hazaribagh area after relocation is also seemed to be impossible due to the enormous risk of consequence of the polluted soil, air and water to the human body and structure.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 22.09.2020
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Indigenous Identity in Witi Ihimaera's 'Whale R...
38,90 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Bachelor Thesis from the year 2011 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 1,0, University of Dusseldorf 'Heinrich Heine', language: English, abstract: In both Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart and Witi Ihimaera's The Whale Rider indigenous identity is a central topic. Yet, it is challenged by the advent of colonization or, in the latter case, by the fusion of ancient tradition and modernism. As such, the aim of this paper is to analyse the literary representation of indigeneity in these novels using Stuart Hall's dual definition in order to show how indigenous identity develops at the backdrop of colonization and what this means for the concept of identity in a postcolonial context. [...] Subsequently, attention will be drawn to the ways in which the individual is representative of indigenous identity and how this relates to the dynamics between community and individual. This part will contrast the idea of a stable self with a transformative one and thus also establish a connection to the succeeding analysis of diaspora identities in Things Fall Apart, which are based on constant progress. [...] The results will then provide the basis for a discussion of relocation and hybridity to subsequently contextualize them in the concept of diaspora identities and, more generally, postcolonialism. Although the focus of the analysis is on Things Fall Apart the background of the last chapter will be used as an occasion for a brief discussion of the second part of his trilogy, No Longer at Ease. After this, a similarly structured analysis of Witi Ihimaera's The Whale Rider will be pursued. Firstly, the literary representation of features of oral tradition and orality in general will be examined before attention is directed towards myth as a major constituent of Maori identity and its use in the novel.[...]To embed the representation of identity in the broader concept of postcolonialism, the novel will then be discussed in terms of rewriting. Nevertheless, the aim of this chapter will not be a comparative approach of the ancient pretext as a basis for the modern novel. How have Western influences and elements of globalization been interwoven in the narration? And how do these contribute to rewriting? The result will be drawn on to answer these questions of the significance of rewriting and relocating for the concept of cultural identity.[...] The purpose of this comparison is to clarify the major differences and similarities which is a prerequisite of the contextualization of the concept of identity in postcolonialism as will be done in the conclusion.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 22.09.2020
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Jahajin
10,95 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

From Calcutta to Trinidad they went, the girmitiyas, crossing two oceans to reach their new homes on the other side of the world. Jahajin illuminates for us the extraordinary experience of that journey: the train ride from Faizabad to Calcutta, the passage down the Hooghly, the three-month voyage around the stormy Cape and up the Atlantic to Trinidad, where the weary migrants settled into life as indentured labourers on the sugar estates. The novel opens with the narrator, a young linguist, talking to 110-year-old Deeda, who came to the Caribbean on the same ship as her great-great grandmother. Deeda speaks of leaving her village in Basti with her son and sailing across the seas to 'Chini-dad', the land of sugar, and about the life and friendships she built on the estate. Nested within this larger story is the dreamlike myth of Saranga, torn between her monkey-lover and her prince. Deeda's stories of a lost world captivate the younger woman, encouraging her to make the journey back across the kala pani. Alive with compelling characters and the lilt of Trinidad Bhojpuri, Jahajin gathers up the various narratives of relocation and transformation across a century in a tale that is part history and part fairy tale.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 22.09.2020
Zum Angebot
Indigenous Identity in Witi Ihimaera's 'Whale R...
25,70 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Bachelor Thesis from the year 2011 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 1,0, University of Dusseldorf 'Heinrich Heine', language: English, abstract: In both Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart and Witi Ihimaera's The Whale Rider indigenous identity is a central topic. Yet, it is challenged by the advent of colonization or, in the latter case, by the fusion of ancient tradition and modernism. As such, the aim of this paper is to analyse the literary representation of indigeneity in these novels using Stuart Hall's dual definition in order to show how indigenous identity develops at the backdrop of colonization and what this means for the concept of identity in a postcolonial context. [...] Subsequently, attention will be drawn to the ways in which the individual is representative of indigenous identity and how this relates to the dynamics between community and individual. This part will contrast the idea of a stable self with a transformative one and thus also establish a connection to the succeeding analysis of diaspora identities in Things Fall Apart, which are based on constant progress. [...] The results will then provide the basis for a discussion of relocation and hybridity to subsequently contextualize them in the concept of diaspora identities and, more generally, postcolonialism. Although the focus of the analysis is on Things Fall Apart the background of the last chapter will be used as an occasion for a brief discussion of the second part of his trilogy, No Longer at Ease. After this, a similarly structured analysis of Witi Ihimaera's The Whale Rider will be pursued. Firstly, the literary representation of features of oral tradition and orality in general will be examined before attention is directed towards myth as a major constituent of Maori identity and its use in the novel.[...]To embed the representation of identity in the broader concept of postcolonialism, the novel will then be discussed in terms of rewriting. Nevertheless, the aim of this chapter will not be a comparative approach of the ancient pretext as a basis for the modern novel. How have Western influences and elements of globalization been interwoven in the narration? And how do these contribute to rewriting? The result will be drawn on to answer these questions of the significance of rewriting and relocating for the concept of cultural identity.[...] The purpose of this comparison is to clarify the major differences and similarities which is a prerequisite of the contextualization of the concept of identity in postcolonialism as will be done in the conclusion.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 22.09.2020
Zum Angebot
Jahajin
9,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

From Calcutta to Trinidad they went, the girmitiyas, crossing two oceans to reach their new homes on the other side of the world. Jahajin illuminates for us the extraordinary experience of that journey: the train ride from Faizabad to Calcutta, the passage down the Hooghly, the three-month voyage around the stormy Cape and up the Atlantic to Trinidad, where the weary migrants settled into life as indentured labourers on the sugar estates. The novel opens with the narrator, a young linguist, talking to 110-year-old Deeda, who came to the Caribbean on the same ship as her great-great grandmother. Deeda speaks of leaving her village in Basti with her son and sailing across the seas to 'Chini-dad', the land of sugar, and about the life and friendships she built on the estate. Nested within this larger story is the dreamlike myth of Saranga, torn between her monkey-lover and her prince. Deeda's stories of a lost world captivate the younger woman, encouraging her to make the journey back across the kala pani. Alive with compelling characters and the lilt of Trinidad Bhojpuri, Jahajin gathers up the various narratives of relocation and transformation across a century in a tale that is part history and part fairy tale.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 22.09.2020
Zum Angebot